Thursday, 9 March 2017

Taking it Easy with Sir Adrian Scrope


Sculpted from white alabaster,  this is the figure of Sir Adrian Scrope, lying on his tomb.

The position of the tomb is quite unusual, so is the pose,  but it does make him look as though he is listening intently to someone.



He died in 1623 and his monument was sculpted by Epiphanius Evesham, a very highly regarded English sculptor at that time.




I think he looks  very much at ease, comfortable.      

His hair is close cropped, which emphasises his strong features.     I love the details on his collar and the way his sash still shows remnants of the original blue paint.








He is reclining on his left elbow, which is placed upon a cushion, while his right arm is pressed over his heart.

Sir Adrian is dressed as a fully armed knight with his helmet behind him with the visor is closed.  His gauntlets and sword lie beside him.

He was, of course, a Royalist!







His monument is to be found in this beautiful Perpendicular church, down a tiny country lane in deepest Lincolnshire.

Some of the tiniest churches hereabouts hold the greatest treasures, if you care to investigate...and I do!



14 comments:

  1. Contrary to you, dear girl, I think he looks very uncomfortable. Indeed, as if he's on a hospital gurney waiting to be seen in A&E! "I've got his pain ... here, Doctor!" he is saying! "Right, send him down to X-ray, Nurse ..."
    Margaret P

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    1. Margaret, that's wonderful! I love it!
      Ah, but just think how easy it would be to sink back onto that cushion for forty winks during a tedious sermon. Bliss! In fact I think he only props himself up like that when someone comes into the church and judging by the Visitors Book, that isn't very often.

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  2. I must agree with you, the pose does look a little unusual. I'm wondering why he is facing a wall...perhaps the wall is a later addition? With all said and speculation aside, it is still a very nice monument to him.

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    1. Hello Meggie, The sculptor who did this work also did that amazing church which I posted about on PTL - do you remember the one which had the huge four poster bed behind the altar? Very theatrical, swamped the tiny church. He was in big demand. From what I have read the tomb was deliberately positioned that way. I guess there is a message in there somewhere!

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  3. How absolutely beautiful is that church?!! Oh my goodness!! I would love to see it in person. xo

    ~ Wendy
    http://Crickleberrycottage.blogspot.com/

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    1. Hello Wendy, I would be very happy to be your guide. This area has many tiny churches, often hidden away and rarely visited. They are steeped in history.

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  4. What an amazing find! Have never even seen a picture, of a deceased person, in such a pose. Very interesting.

    Oh how lovely, to be able to seek out old churches, and find what treasures they may hold.

    Since it is old, wonder if it has those interesting bits of Pagan past, somewhere in its decoration.... Love those!!!!

    Luna Crone

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    1. Many of the ancient churches are built on such sites. This church dates from the 1300's, with lots of alterations and additions. It always pays to read up about them before a visit in order not to miss such details. Far too many old churches have been sold and converted into homes.
      Sir Adrian's pose is very unusual indeed, that was what drew me to this church. Glad you enjoyed seeing him.

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  5. I think he might give me a start, as though he were about to speak. It is a fine piece of work. I love the old church!

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    1. Hello Chip, I have a photograph of my husband looking at him and that gave me a start the first time I saw it. It looked for all the world as though they were having a serious talk! It is a very small church, but fascinating nonetheless.

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  6. I need to go there, what a superb tomb effigy

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    1. Bill, you would love our rural churches. Some are big, others tiny, and yet they have great stories to tell. This is a really amazing and tiny church, not far from Lincoln. this link is from my old blog https://applebeesatpeartree.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/welcome-to-interior-of-theatrical.html

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  7. What a wonderful sculpture of Sir Adrian Scrope, such expression in his face. Thank you so much for sharing :)

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    1. He looks quite like one of our friends from the village, i wonder whether he is a distant relative.

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