Thursday, 10 January 2019

I Can See Clearly Now

I was driving along a quiet road with very little traffic, however,  the pavements were bustling with pedestrians, cyclists, skateboarders and scooters.       I found myself approaching a T junction when suddenly I lost my eyesight, I could see nothing.    All I could do was wind down the windows, listen for traffic and then pull out slowly and carefully because I wasn't 'allowed' to stop the car to get out.     It was terrifying. 

Then I woke up.

Amateur dream analysts could have a field day with that one.   

I am not aware of having any major life decisions to make and I am certainly not under any particular stress... unless you count having to decide between finishing off a puff quilt, which should have been completed a year ago, or starting on crocheting a throw and indulging in a bit of colour therapy as I find up my wool...

I do suffer from two kinds of migraine, one of them being the painless variety,  where the sight in one eye goes, to be replaced by a kind of firecracker worm which dances around for about 20 minutes.      I had one of those episodes last week, so perhaps that was on my mind.

I have had my eye test, nothing has changed much over the last two years, so all is well in the department.



Perhaps I should put a sprig of Rosemary under my head tonight - "The leves layde under the heade whanne a man slepes, it doth away evell spirites and suffereth not to dreeme fowle dremes ne to be afeade."    Taken from an old MS in the British Museum - A Garden of Herbs, by Eleanour Sinclair Rohde.


 





31 comments:


  1. That sounds quite scary. Glad your eyes are all right.

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  2. Try the rosemary. Doubt if it makes any difference but with dreams like that I'd try anything!

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    1. Rosemary is ready and waiting for tonight!

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  3. Migraine, you have my sympathy. Apart from the usual retire to bed in a darkened room type I have also experienced vision migraine. My recent suspected TIA was maybe an attack they thought? The scariest ones are where parts of people’s faces disappear or words in a book. I often marvel at what a superb piece of kit our bodies are. Take it easy Elaine, cut yourself some slack, your crafting plans sound superb. The puff quilt could be a blog post all to itself...

    LX

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    1. Sorry to hear that you have had such problems, Lettice. I have tried a bit of meditation - and intend to work it into my daily routine. Long walks with the dog help - just saying, in case your lovely hubby is listening. ;)

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  4. I've never had migraine headaches and didn't know the occasional problems with strange shapes moving was a type of migraine, until the optician told me last month.........an age thing he said..........oh goody!
    Suffolk Puffs I presume?!

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    1. Suffolk Puffs for the next one, that is for sure. The unfinished one is like a whole series of mini-cushions, hundreds of the bally things. I must have been mad when i started on that one!!

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  5. I have the visual 20 minute migraines - I had one in the car once. When they start they begin with what looks like a raindrop on a pain of glass and I think oh no here we go again. The rain drop expands to cover my whole field of vision with moving waves of colour until it begins to move off down to one corner and then after exactly 20 minutes completely disappears - I could boil an egg by it if I wanted it very hard!!
    As with Lettice I have also had the ones where peoples faces partly disappear etc. My consultant told me it is a brain eye problem rather than the organic bit of the eye. Either way they are unpleasant if they happen when you are out. Haven't had either for ages but my mum is now suffereing with them!
    I wouldn't worry about the dream most of them are related to things being sorted in your subconsious that you may not even be aware of. I would do whichever craft you feel more in tune with at the moment and leave the other aside for a while - it sounds like the crocheting might win.

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    1. The very first visual one I had (25 years ago!) was when I was driving my car to work - at a doctor's surgery, as it happens, so I got one of them to check me out and he told me what it was. It is odd about the 20 minutes thing, I haven't timed mine, but it is definitely about 20 minutes. The more conventional migraines which I have last three days - and I can almost feel them tip toe away at the end of the 72 hours. Weird.
      The crocheting won out - I couldn't resist, it is a very peaceful occupation which leaves a good part of my mind free to do other things - mainly because I am doing a very simple throw!

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  6. Strange dreams can often leave you feeling a little anxious but a good dose of crafting will hopefully put that to rights. I hate the visual migraines very scary when half your vision just disappears then returns after a bit then something else disappears, always at an inappropriate time too. xcx

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    1. Hello Chrissie, My heart sinks when I suddenly become aware that there is something happening to my vision, the I become aware of the ghostly beginnings of the 'worm' and I know what is to come. It certainly makes me appreciate normal eyesight.xx

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  7. Dreams are mysterious! Maybe something you saw on TV sparked things off in your sleep. I pray there are no more catastrophic happenings, especially with your eyesight.

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    1. Hello Valerie, I'm glad to say that everything is back to normal - and no nasty dreams last night, though I have just picked some Rosemary to try out tonight, just in case!!

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  8. Waking up from strange dreams can leave you feeling very disorientated but thank goodness it was a dream. Sight is very precious so I'm glad to hear yours is okay. The rosemary would be very aromatic and hopefully induce a peaceful sleep much like lavender:)

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    1. 'Worse things happen at sea' as my father used to say. I am always a lot more appreciative of good eyesight after one of those episodes. 20 minutes of enforced rest is not a bad thing, especially as I do tend to dash about a fair bit.

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  9. How unpleasant. I'm glad your eyes are OK and it was "just a dream". In my worst ones I seem to be running round naked, not sure what that's meant to mean, or the frequent ones of looking at houses and there are gigantic ruined areas when you open a door - that's scary too, as we have normally agreed to buy it at that point! (I think that comes from having bought this house, and there always seems to be another job to be done here).

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    1. Houses like yours are not for the faint-hearted, are they! You have worked so hard on it - let's hope that this is the year when you can move on and begin a new (but much easier) adventure, BB. Eeeks to the naked dreams!

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  10. You took away my breath in that first paragraph, and my heart is still in my throat. What a dream! I don't see dreams as portents, just as a remix of events. It's good you eyes are basically fine.

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    1. All's well, Joanne. Just one of those things, back to normal now.

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  11. What a grand opening paragraph for a novel, not so good when it is happening to you in a dream. Hope you manage to find a solution for an undisturbed nights rest.

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    1. I will be trying out the rosemary trick tonight, not that I have had any more nightmares, but just in case!

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  12. Oh my, such a dream is a bit unnerving. Don't know if one is to try to figure it out... Or just forget about it.

    But do try the Rosemary. Can't hurt. :-)

    ✨✨✨✨

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    1. I have a lovely fresh bunch of rosemary at the ready, wow. It grows so well in our gardens, that I may as well, it certainly won't hurt to try.

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  13. Yikes. What a dream! Aren't you so grateful to wake up and find out it was a dream? Our subconscious is an interesting force. I never knew the protective powers of rosemary - I might go out and get a hedge-worth and cover my pillow. I need all the help I can get!

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    1. Hello Susan, We planted a rosemary hedge the other year, I must have been planning against such an eventuality! It seems to really like our garden, does much better than the lavender hedge which was there originally.

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  14. Love how you com eup with these old remidies

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    1. That's down to my lovely, tatty, old books, Bill. So much more on offer than just food, I love them!

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  15. Re: your comment on my blog...... -chuckle- "Marie" and I, have "infected" you, with the "Tidy-Bug", hu??? ,-))) Oh that is so cute.

    It is a bit infectious, I know. I'm feeling so 'virtuous' about what I've done, that I don't want to stop.

    And I really can't! We are moving our upstairs bedroom, down to the never-used front room. And the get-rid-of-things will be continuing!!!!!

    I am so very, very happy, that this is finally happening! I have wanted to do it, for a long time. But my husband always found "another solution." But now, it is in-the-works!!!! -happy dance-

    ✨✨✨✨

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  16. I used to suffer hemiplegic migraines; they disappeared several years after I first started having them, as mysteriously as they arrived, though not as dramatically! I still haven’t mastered crochet, so am knitting another baby blanket. I have a ready supply of gifts for the friends of my daughters.

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    1. That must have been really frightening, I'm glad to hear that you no longer suffer them, Scarlet. As to crochet - I haven't mastered it either, but I can do some very basic stitches - and when the old cat, Sparky, decides to have a mischievous play with my crocheting, it isn't so much of a problem. I imagine your baby blankets are very popular!

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Lovely to hear from you!